MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16
MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16
MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16
MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16
MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16
MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16
MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16

MARY JANE Q CROSS LTD ED PRINT ~ PORTRAIT WOMAN ~ Finger Painting SIGNED 10 x 16

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MARY JANE Q CROSS LIMITED EDITION PRINT ~ PORTRAIT of WOMAN ~ Signed Numbered 10.5 x 16 inches 

This is a 2003 limited edition 14/250 giclee print by New Hampshire Artist Mary Jane Q. Cross entitled "NOONDAY LULL".

Based on my research, it appears that the artist has not chosen to sell many prints of her oil paintings. I could find none for sale or recently sold. Her work generally sells from $1000- $20,000.

She is a very unusual artist. Due to a tremor in her hands, she paints with her fingers. It's amazing how she is able to accomplish such detailed realism with her fingers.

  • Mark: Signed lower left, 14/250
  • Measurements ( WxHxD): 10.5 x 16 inches
  • Condition: See photos and use zoom to fully evaluate condition. No damage noted.

The print will be rolled up and shipped in a tube.

About the Artist
Born in 1951, American painter Mary Jane Q. Cross received her formal training at the Worcester Art Museum, in 1970 to 1973 in a time of Expressionism. Followed by workshops with Daniel Green and mentoring with Fran Hoyt (student of Vincent Dumond), Mary Jane designed her own curriculum based on the Atelier System, to gain the tools necessary to make her art speak with historic purity, and her own unique voice.

Awards accumulated for the artist from early years on the outdoor festival circuit, where 30,000 a year regularly followed her career. She has membership and awards from American Artists Professional League, Allied Artists of America, Catharine Lorillard Wolfe club, Oil Portrait Society of America, Exhibits with Oil Painters of America 2006, 2008, 2009 and other notable organizations.

Artist Statement
"I received my formal training at The Worcester Art Museum school in the early 1970’s where I was a closet realist in a time of expressionism, I looked long and hard as to where my heart as a painter lay. Quietly I have trained myself under the influence of the Pre-Raphaelites and this can be seen in the realism part of my work. Out of necessity since losing so much of my ability to do brushwork, I have explored the more impressionist styles. And the resultant dreamy quality of the two styles has melded into a voice that is my own. They become my own paintings that wrap me with arms I have never seen.

A workshop with OPAM Daniel Greene in the early 1980’s was a catalyst for my work.

As a mid career artist I work alone without assistants in my New Hampshire studio. I am well known for painting three main subjects: the genre figure in lyrical activities, lilies in reflective water, or landscapes in soft light effects. In my oil paintings I am most looking to achieve, respect for the truth of a subject, that lets my work find meaning for others. If this is done with close attention, with academic craftsmanship that achieves a spirited and self assured vigorous presentment, I feel I am creating something I have not seen before.

We all deal with things we cannot change. My difficulty as a painter is a tremor that makes it quite troublesome to use tools. Brushes, pencils, even table utensils. After a long career as a Classical painter, I spent 5 ½ years in the mid 1990’s re-learning my profession to settle successfully on a manner of fingerpainting. All of my paintings are 95 to 98% painted with my fingers. The remaining 2 to 5 % is refined in small strategic places with a brush, but using prosthetic devices, of my own invention and adaptation.

Additionally over the years of learning the craft of picking up the perfect amount of paint, whether in a small straight line or half moon curve has honed my hand eye coordination to make painting a lifetime of joy and delight. Most artists have a tremendous number of brushes. I have ten but mostly use five (fingers).

Only recently I have become comfortable considering myself an American Pre-Raphaelite with many of the similar spiritual and rather old-fashioned ideas of elegant dreams of women and courtly respect. And true to their ideals I am also drawn toward wanting to enrich my work with inspiring spiritual values and nobility."

Pleasing myself in the work can be difficult and I hope to be working pleasantly until I die. Perfecting and never reaching that perfection is the vocation of being a painter. I laughingly think need 3 lifetimes to paint half the paintings in my vision. Looking forward to eternity, this is only a small portion of the work I desire to accomplish.

It is my desire that my paintings outlive me."