SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE
SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE
SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE
SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE
SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE
SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE
SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE

SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE

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SEVILLE SPAIN Giralda Tower ~ Vintage Mid Century LITHOGRAPH Print ~ Ida Libby DENGROVE

  • Mark: Unsigned || marked Ida Libby Dengrove 1967 in lower right corner
  • Measurements (WxH): 20 x 16 inches
  • Condition: See photos and use zoom to fully evaluate condition. A small area of brown discoloration on bottom center edge, which could be concealed with a matte.

This print will be rolled up and shipped in a tube.

The Giralda (Spanish: La Giralda) is the bell tower of the Seville Cathedral in Seville, Spain. It was originally built as a minaret during the Moorish period, during the reign of the Almohad dynasty with a Renaissance style top subsequently added by Spanish conquistadors after the expulsion of the Muslims from the area. The Giralda was registered in 1987 as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO along with the Real Alcazar and the General Archive of the Indies. The tower is 104.1 m (342 ft) in height and remains one of the most important symbols of the city, as it has been since medieval times.

About the Artist
Ida Libby Dengrove (1919-2005) was a New York courtroom artist who visualized the moods and faces of some notorious trials for the television audience. Aside from her portraiture, she was also known for her Judaica art depicting scenes from Jewish life, and landscapes. Born in Philadelphia to Russian immigrants, Dengrove attended Moore College of Art and studied in Europe on a John Frederick Lewis Memorial Fellowship. She honed her skills during World War II by drawing portraits of wounded soldiers and Army recruits for the U.S.O. 

In 1972, NBC News advertised its need for a courtroom artist. Dengrove heard about the job, grabbed her sketchpad and hopped on a Manhattan-bound train. She didn’t bother to set up an appointment; she just walked into NBC Studios and requested a try-out. During her job interview, Dengrove drew sketches of the person in front of her. She was hired on the spot. Ms. Dengrove worked as a courtroom illustrator for NBC-TV from 1973 to 1986. It allowed her to take her sketch pad where cameras were forbidden and capture the proceedings in her own distinctive style. For the next 15 years, Dengrove’s artwork accompanied the network’s trial stories, including the Jonestown massacre, the Mafia, John Gotti, John Lennon’s deportation, John Hinckley, Gen. William Westmoreland, Bernhard Goetz, Dr. Tarnower, etc.

Her pictorial reportage won two Emmy awards. She was cited for her newscast illustrations of the sensational Son of Sam trial of David Berkowitz (1977-78), and again for the Murder at the Met trial (1980-81) of Craig Crimmins, the stagehand convicted of killing a young violinist, Helen Mintiks.

Dengrove discussed her broadcasting experiences in the 1990 memoir, “My Days in Court: Unique Views of the Famous and Infamous by a Court Artist.”  Ms. Dengrove herself fell victim to a crime in 1982. Eighty of her courtroom sketches were mounted in a lobby show at the U.S. Courthouse at Foley Square. One morning, a portrait of John Lennon and Yoko Ono was gone from its place high up on a wall. "They took it like they took the Mona Lisa," she noted at the time.